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LMU 275 – Choline Deficiency is Prevalent and a Major Factor in Alzheimer’s disease Development.

Choline Deficiency is Prevalent and a Major Factor in Alzheimer’s disease Development.

Source: J Aging Cell (January 15, 2023)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (February 1, 2023)

For many years I have been telling my students, colleagues, patients, and members of the public that research consistently shows that lack of sufficient choline intake each day is a major contributing factor in the development age-related memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease and other common health problems. The research paper published in the journal Aging Cell in January of 2023 has once again provided further evidence for this claim.

As these researchers from Arizona State University pointed out, choline is required to make the memory chemical in the brain known as acetylcholine and studies show that more than 90% of American are not getting the recommended amount of dietary choline, which is set at 425 mg/d for adult women and 550 mg/d for adult men. The researchers point out that not only aren’t 90% or more of the population not getting the daily recommended amount of choline, but they suggest that the recommended daily intake level for choline should be set even higher if a person wants to stave off the development of Alzheimer’s disease over their lifetime.

These researchers induced choline deficiency in both normal mice and mice that have been bred to be at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (transgenic mice). The results showed that in both normal mice and transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mice choline deficiency resulted in liver damage, enlargement of the heart and neurological alterations in the transgenic mice, as they showed an increased development of amyloid plaque and breakdown of the tau protein leading to neurofibrillary tangles  –  common features in human Alzheimer’s disease. In normal and transgenic mice, lack of choline also caused significant weight gain, and alterations in blood sugar regulation leading to diabetes, as well as deficits in motor skills. Regarding humans, one of the researchers stated, “it’s a twofold problem, first, people don’t reach the adequate daily intake of choline established by the Institute of Medicine in 1998. And secondly, there is vast literature showing that the recommended daily intake amounts are not optimal for brain-related functions.” They go on to explain how lack of sufficient choline each day also compromises learning and memory in humans. So, where can you get choline from food? The highest concentrations are found in animal-based foods like egg yolks, beef, salmon, and poultry. But if you are trying to go more plant-based, as I think you should, then you can get appreciable amounts of choline from soybeans and soy foods, as well as brussels sprouts, cauliflower, peanut butter, almonds, oat bran, beans, peas, broccoli, and whole wheat toast as well as some other foods, like wheat germ and soy lecithin – which most people don’t eat.

So, some prudent advice is to take 2 lecithin capsules per day (1200 mg per capsule), which provides 180 mg of choline per capsule, plus some other great phospholipids that the body can use for many purposes. After age 55 you should really add a supplement that contains:

  • CDP-choline
  • Huperzine A
  • Phosphatidylserine
  • Bacopa monnieri
  •  

Why? After age 55, it becomes more difficult for choline to cross the blood-brain-barrier and get into brin cells. The nutrients found in a supplement like this have been shown in human clinical studies to support memory function, especially in older subjects, helping them maintain and sometimes reverse early-stage memory loss and achieve more optimal brain levels of the memory chemical acetylcholine.

I have included the reference for this research paper in the text below.


Reference:

Nikhil Dave, Jessica M. Judd, Annika Decker, Wendy Winslow, Patrick Sarette, Oscar Villarreal Espinosa, Savannah Tallino, Samantha K. Bartholomew, Alina Bilal, Jessica Sandler, Ian McDonough, Joanna K. Winstone, Erik A. Blackwood, Christopher Glembotski, Timothy Karr, Ramon Velazquez. Dietary choline intake is necessary to prevent systems‐wide organ pathology and reduce Alzheimer’s disease hallmarks. Aging Cell, 2023;  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acel.13775

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,
Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 274 – Brown Rice Much Superior to White Rice for Health Outcomes

Brown Rice Much Superior to White Rice for Health Outcomes

Source: International Journal of Molecular Science (January 2023)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (January 25, 2023)

Many of us are often faced with the decision between choosing white rice or brown rice to accompany a meal. In the moment it can seem like a very benign and insignificant choice to make, but recent research has shown us that brown rice is a far superior health choice. For example, in 2019 a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition showed that providing overweight type 2 diabetics with brown rice instead of white rice for three months resulted in significant improvements in health parameters in the group ingesting the brown rice six days per week.

The brown rice group saw a significant drop in hemoglobin A1c, which is a marker for blood sugar control, as well as a decline in the bad cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) and a decline in inflammatory blood markers. Moreover, epidemiology studies indicate that the consumption of white rice is strongly associated with the development of type 2 diabetes, while the opposite is true for brown rice consumption. Other studies dating back to 2014 have shown that brown rice, substituted for white rice, improves blood sugar regulation in diabetic subjects as well as cholesterol and inflammatory markers.

 In January of 2023 an important study was published in the International Journal of Molecular Science showing that constituents found in brown rice, not present in white rice, also increase the body’s defense against free radical damage by boosting antioxidant levels. We are learning that brown rice contains a unique molecule known as CAF (cycloartenyl ferulate), which is not found in white rice. CAF, which is both a polyphenol and phytosterol substance, shows impressive antioxidant properties and turns on, like an epigenetic switch, the synthesis of another important antioxidant made by the body, known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). As well, brown rice contains various vitamin E compounds, which are also known to provide antioxidant protection in the body. The 2023 study showed that CAF in brown rice was able to significantly reduce free radical damage from hydrogen peroxide in mouse hepatoma cells, as a demonstration of its impressive antioxidant properties.  It’s also worth mentioning that 100 gm (3.5 oz) of brown rice provides 1.6-2.0 gm of fiber, while the same amount of white rice contains only 0.4 gm of fiber. Most of the fiber in brown rice is insoluble fiber, which helps support bowel regularity. Some studies have also shown that eating brown rice instead of white rice aids in weight loss.

The bottom line is that brown rice is much superior to white rice for many reasons and the 2023 study has shown that it evens provides unexpected antioxidant support to the body, which is associated with slowing the aging process and guarding against other cellular damage from free radicals linked to many degenerative diseases.

I have included the study references in the text below.


References:

 

Malik V.S. et al Substituting brown rice for white rice on diabetes risk factors in India: a randomized controlled study. British J  Nutrition. 2019; 12 (12): 1389-1397. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/substituting-brown-rice-for-white-rice-on-diabetes-risk-factors-in-india-a-randomised-controlled-trial/A0778FC028F6F25D0E6A73787EECECC4

 

Hongyan Wu, Toshiyuki Nakamura, Yingnan Guo, Riho Matsumoto, Shintaro Munemasa, Yoshiyuki Murata, Yoshimasa Nakamura. Cycloartenyl Ferulate Is the Predominant Compound in Brown Rice Conferring Cytoprotective Potential against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cytotoxicity. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2023; 24 (1): 822

 https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/24/1/822

 

Mohan V et al. Effect of brown rice, white rice and brow rice with legumes on blood glucose and insulin responses in overweight Indians: A randomized controlled trial. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2014; 16(5): 17-25. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24447043/

 

Brown vs White Rice – Is one better for your health? Healthline  August 16, 2021. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/brown-vs-white-rice

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 273 – Regular Use of Vitamin D Supplements May Cut Melanoma Risk by More Than 50%

Regular Use of Vitamin D Supplements May Cut Melanoma Risk by More Than 50%

Source: J Melanoma Research (December 2022)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (January 18, 2023)

We all know that melanoma is a very lethal form of skin cancer and the risk of developing a melanoma has increased in recent years. The American Cancer Society states that 1:38 Caucasians and 1:1000 blacks will develop melanoma in their lifetime, according to current data. So, the study published in the journal Melanoma Research in December 2022 should be viewed as being very important and instructive. Most people know that we should avoid too much UV-light exposure and protect our skin with proper clothing, hats, sunglasses, and sunscreens to help reduce risk of melanoma.

But the 2022 study in Melanoma Research suggests that regular use of vitamin D supplements alone may reduce our risk of melanoma by more than 50%, after controlling statistically for other important risk factors. Moreover, the patients studied in this trial were all patients who were already at increased risk for melanoma development, including 96 immune compromised patients. Overall, the study involved almost 500 dermatology patients, who were at increased risk for melanoma development (ages 21-79 years of age). The study showed that regular users of vitamin D supplements had more than a 50% lower incidence of developing melanoma that non-users of vitamin D supplements.

As the researchers indicated, other recent studies have provided evidence of the benefits of vitamin D in melanoma, as well, such as the association with vitamin D supplementation and less aggressive melanoma lesions. The 2022 study was conducted in an area of Finland where melanoma incidence is known to be quite high. Unfortunately, this study showed that vitamin D supplementation did not reduce the severity of severity of photoaging, facial photoaging, actinic keratoses, nevus count, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. It appeared that vitamin D supplementation was most impressive in its ability to help to reduce the development of melanoma – but that alone is very impressive and potentially lifesaving. The researchers did not comment on what dosage of vitamin D we should be taking each day, but for most people I think we can assume that 1,000 – 2,000 IU per day is a reasonable dosage, which will usually get your blood level into a protective range against many health conditions. The blood level of vitamin D to aim for, unless otherwise indicated by your doctor, is 85-150 nmol/L or 34 – 60 ng/ml

I have included the reference for this study in the text below.

References:

Kanasuo E et al. Regular use of vitamin D supplement is associated with fewer melanoma cases compared to non-use: a cross-sectional study in 498 adult subjects at risk for skin cancers. J Melanoma Researc. 2022. https://journals.lww.com/melanomaresearch/Abstract/9900/Regular_use_of_vitamin_D_supplement_is_associated.51.aspx

 

Science Daily. Fewer cases of melanoma among people taking vitamin D supplements. January 8, 2023. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2023/01/230109112555.htm

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 272 – Nutrition and Lifestyle Significantly Affect Colorectal Cancer Risk

LMU-272

Nutrition and Lifestyle Significantly Affect Colorectal Cancer Risk

Source: European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study (Am J Gastroenterology, December 2022)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (January 11, 2023)

In the December 2022 update from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study, researchers reported their most recent findings with respect to the association between colorectal cancer incidence and nutrition, lifestyle, and body weight (BMI) measurements. The study followed almost 300,000 (295,865) people, mostly 35 to 70 years of age, for an average of 7.8 years,  who lived in Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

At the outset of the study, the researchers calculated a healthy lifestyle index (HLI) score for each subject, based on smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity. The data showed that a favorable healthy lifestyle score was associated with a 23% lower risk of developing colorectal cancer compared to an unfavorable healthy lifestyle score. This meant that people who didn’t smoke, avoided or ingested very little alcohol, who were at or near their ideal body weight, and who exercised regularly, had a risk of developing colorectal cancer that was 23% lower than those who were overweight, and/or who smoked, drank more alcohol and/or was less physically active. These findings should not be surprising as epidemiology studies suggest that 70-90% of colorectal cancer is preventable through more prudent diet and lifestyle factors.

With respect to diet and colorectal cancer, a study published in the BMC Medicine journal in November 2022 showed that men who ate the most plant-based foods had a 22% reduced risk of colon cancer, compared with those who ate the least. As they indicated, eating more plant foods increases the consumption of fiber and antioxidants associated with cancer prevention. As they also stated, it has long been known that people who avoid meat are at reduced risk, and this study adds additional evidence. Earlier in 2022 (August) a review of three other prospective studies was published in the British Medical Journal and showed that high consumption of ultra-processed foods was associated with an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, especially in men. The combined results of these prospective studies provided strong evidence that men who ingested the highest amount of ultra-processed foods had a 29% increased risk of developing colorectal cancer compared to men with the lowest intake of these foods.

Overall, these studies, all published in the year 2022, continue to support the premise that healthier diet and lifestyle habits can help to prevent colorectal cancer development. As colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death, when you combine statistics for men and women, these findings take on an even greater degree of importance. Early detection of colorectal cancer is very important, especially after age 50, via colonoscopy, but in my opinion. you should also follow the principles of a colon cancer-prevention diet and lifestyle, as highlighted by the studies presented here, to help prevent the development of colon cancer in the first place.

I have included the references for all these studies in the text below.

References:

1. Edorardo B et al. Changes in lifestyle and risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Am J Gastroenterol. Dec 2, 2022. https://journals.lww.com/ajg/Abstract/9900/Changes_in_Lifestyle_and_Risk_of_Colorectal_Cancer.550.aspx

2. Medscape Review of Article: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/986379?src=wnl_recnlnew3_ous_230102_MSCPEDIT_&uac=342474MN&impID=5055634  

3. Kim J et al. Plant-based dietary patterns defined by a priori indices and colorectal cancer risk by sex and race/ethnicity: the Multiethnic Cohort Study. BMC Medicine. November 2022. https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-022-02623-71.

4. Wang L et al. Association of ultra-processed food consumption with colorectal cancer risk among men and women: Results from three prospective US cohort studies. BMJ August 2022. https://www.bmj.com/content/378/bmj-2021-068921

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 271 – Kiwifruit Improves Constipation, IBS, Indigestion/Reflux, and Abdominal Discomfort

LMU-271

Kiwifruit Improves Constipation, IBS, Indigestion/Reflux, and Abdominal Discomfort

Source: American Journal of Gastroenterology (December 2022)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (January 5, 2023)

A study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology in December 2022, showed that patients with functional constipation and constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome, who were instructed to consume two green kiwifruits per day for four weeks, experienced a significant improvement in constipation problems and abdominal discomfort. The other treatment group was instructed to consume 7.5 grams of psyllium husk fiber per day, which is also known to improve constipation problems.

The study showed that kiwifruit consumption improved bowel movement frequency to a similar degree as psyllium husk fiber, but kiwifruit consumption provided the added benefit of softer, easier-to-eliminate stools and reduced abdominal discomfort to a much greater degree. In the post-study interview, published on Medscape, the researchers further explained that not only did kiwifruit consumption improve bowel regularity, but it improved stool consistency, ease of elimination, abdominal comfort and it improved symptoms of indigestion, reflux, and abdominal pain in many patients. They explained that the fiber in the cell walls of kiwifruit swells and holds water once in the intestinal tract, which softens stools and increases bowel movement frequency. Certain constituents in kiwifruit, such as raphides, may alter mucin production, which leads to improved laxation – proving a mild laxative effect from the secretion of a slippery film (mucin) along the inner surface of the colon wall.

 This multicenter trial involved over 180 patients living in Japan, Italy, and New Zealand. After four weeks on either kiwifruit or psyllium husk fiber, the participants had a 4-week period with no treatment (washout period). Then each group switched – meaning that those originally ingesting the psyllium ingested Kiwifruit instead and vice versa. This is known as a cross-over trial. As I mentioned, kiwifruit intake provided similar benefits to psyllium husk fiber regarding increased bowel movement frequency but provided a much greater benefit with respect to stool consistency, ease of elimination, overall abdominal comfort level and reduced indigestion and reflux symptoms. As the researchers concluded, “taken in conjunction with previous clinical trials of green kiwifruit and the emerging physiological data from functional studies, consumption of two green kiwifruits per day can be safely recommended as an effective treatment for constipation in those with functional gastrointestinal disorders that will also provide improvements in symptoms of GI comfort”.

I think this research is important, as according to a 2020 publication in the American Journal of Gastroenterology (June 2020), chronic functional constipation affects 9-20% of the adult U.S. population and is defined as unsatisfactory defecation and difficult or infrequent stools, often involving fewer than three complete bowel movements per week. And about 11% of the population suffers from irritable bowel syndrome. So, for many people adding two green fresh kiwifruits to their daily food consumption might provide some welcomed relief to this very common problem. Of course, consuming a more plant-based diet, eating more fiber in general, as well as getting regular exercise and adequate fluid intake, are other natural ways to help improve bowel function and overall health, in general.

I have included the references for this information in the text below.

References:

1. Richard G et al. Consumption of two green kiwifruit daily improves constipation and abdominal comfort- results on an international multicentre randomized controlled trial. Am J Gastroenterol. December 2022. https://journals.lww.com/ajg/Abstract/9900/Consumption_of_two_green_kiwifruit_daily_improves.592.aspx

2. Medscape Interview: Kiwifruit found effective for constipation. Medscape. January 3, 2023. Harrison L. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/986297?src=wnl_recnlnew2_ous_230102_MSCPEDIT_&uac=342474MN&impID=5055634#vp_2

3. Oh S.J et al. Chronic constipation in the United States: Results from a population-based survey assessing healthcare seeking and use of pharmacotherapy. Am J Gastroenterol. June 2020 https://journals.lww.com/ajg/fulltext/2020/06000/chronic_constipation_in_the_united_states__results.19.aspx

4. Bellini M et al. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation: Fact and fiction. World J Gastroenterol. 2015; 21(40): 11362-11370 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4616212/


Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 270 – 2 – 3 Cups of Coffee Per Day Doubles the Risk of Death in Those with Grade 2 Hypertension (High Blood Pressure), but No Risk from Green Tea Intake

LMU-270

2 - 3 Cups of Coffee Per Day Doubles the Risk of Death in Those with Grade 2 Hypertension (High Blood Pressure), but No Risk from Green Tea Intake

Source: American Heart Association Study (December 2022)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (December 27, 2022)

An abundance of research in recent years has shown that regular consumption of caffeinated coffee can help reduce the risk of age—related dementia, liver cancer, and non-alcohol-induced fatty liver problems or NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis)  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1665268120301691#:~:text=Studies%20have%20shown%20that%20high,diagnosed%20with%20NASH%20%5B28%5D. Caffeine, from coffee and tea, also turns-off the mTOR pathway, an effect that is strongly linked to reducing the risk of several common cancers, such as stomach and colon cancer.

modulator. It has also been shown to reduce the release of inflammatory chemicals (cytokines) seen in many types of arthritis, and through various signaling pathways within cells caffeine is shown to help kill emerging tumor cells and demonstrates other impressive anti-cancer properties (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1665268120301691#:~:text=Studies%20have%20shown%20that%20high,diagnosed%20with%20NASH%20%5B28%5D.)

As well, caffeine also switches on our longevity genes (Sirtuin 1 gene), which helps the body burn fat more effectively, increases the production of new energy factories in our brain cells (mitochondria biogenesis), and helps inhibit the release of inflammatory chemicals (cytokines) associated with arthritic and other conditions (heart disease). Sirtuin 1 activity also increases insulin sensitivity, which helps to improve blood sugar (glucose) regulation in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Sirtuin 1 activity is also shown to improve blood cholesterol and lipid levels, and thus, is linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. As well, increased Sirtuin 1 activity increases DNA repair and lengthens telomeres at the ends of our DNA strands, which are effects associated with cancer prevention and anti-aging. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9181040/)

So, there have been a lot of impressive studies in recent years showing the health benefits of regular coffee consumption. But is caffeinated coffee safe to drink if you have high blood pressure (hypertension)? We know that caffeine is also a stimulant, which means it can potentially elevate heart rate and blood pressure. Well, a large study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association in December 2022 has helped to answer that question. The study looked at data from over 18,000 subjects (ages 40-75) living in Japan (65% women) and followed these individuals for 19 consecutive years. After assessing blood pressure measurements over the years and looking at subjects’ caffeine intake from coffee and green tea, the researchers noted that greater coffee consumption (2-3 cups per day) was associated with having double the risk of death from cardiovascular disease in subjects who had a blood pressure reading at or above 160-179 over 100-109 mm Hg (grade 2 hypertension), compared to subjects with similar blood pressure readings who did not drink coffee. No association between coffee consumption and cardiovascular disease deaths was observed in patients with normal or high normal blood pressure or in those with grade 1 hypertension (high blood pressure).

So, normal blood pressure is a reading of less than 130 over 85 mm Hg, high normal is 130-139 over 85-89 mm Hg, and grade 1 hypertension (high blood pressure) is a reading of 140-159 over 90-99 mm Hg. Interestingly, green tea consumption (although it contains caffeine) was not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease deaths in patients with normal blood pressure or any degree of high blood pressure – making it a safer choice for those with high blood pressure problems. Remember that green tea also contains EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate), which like caffeine, also activates Sirtuin longevity genes, and in turn, results in increased fat burning, support of memory function, and provides a host of impressive anticancer properties, some of which have been proven in patients with certain cancers or precancerous conditions  Some studies show that EGCG from green tea and green tea extract supplements can also improve blood sugar (glucose), cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as I have commented on in previous Lifestyle Medicine Updates. So, for most people, two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day can provide some impressive health benefits, as can green tea and likely black tea consumption. But for those with high blood pressure, it appears that they should avoid caffeinated coffee, and possibly use green tea as an alternative caffeinated beverage. Remember of course, and as the researchers commented in their Medscape interview, adding cream and sugar (not to mention whipped cream and chocolate) to these drinks very much detracts from their health benefits and is likely to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease by raising blood cholesterol and blood sugar (glucose) levels.

I have included the references and links for the American Heart Association Journal study and the Medscape review article of this study, in the text below

References:

Teramoto M et al. Coffee and green tea consumption and cardiovascular disease mortality among people with and without hypertension. J Am Heart Assoc (December 21, 2022) https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/986018?src=wnl_recnlnew1_ous_221226_MSCPEDIT_&uac=342474MN&impID=5032436#vp_2:~:text=No%20associations%20between,total%20cholesterol%20level.

Medscape: Greater Coffee Intake in Severe HTN Tied to Higher CV Mortality. Marilynn Larkin (December 22, 2022) https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/986018?src=wnl_recnlnew1_ous_221226_MSCPEDIT_&uac=342474MN&impID=5032436#vp_2:~:text=No%20associations%20between,total%20cholesterol%20level.

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 269 – Women Need Additional 25 gm of Protein per day to Prevent Hip Fractures

LMU-269

Women Need Additional 25 gm of Protein per day to Prevent Hip Fractures

Source: J Clinical Nutrition (2022)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (November 15, 2022)

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition in December 2022 showed that most women should be getting an extra 25 gm of protein per day to prevent hip fractures as they age. This large study also showed that drinking coffee and tea helped to reduce hip fracture risk by an additional 4% per cup, as coffee and tea contain polyphenols that help to support bone density in a similar way as the hormone estrogen. This study (The UK Women’s Cohort Study) followed over 26,000 women (ages 35-69) for an average period of 22.3 years.

The study showed that women who ingested an extra 25 gm of protein per day had a 14% lower risk of having a hip fracture during the 22-year follow-up period. As well, every additional cup of tea or coffee was associated with a 4% lower risk of hip fracture. It is not uncommon for women to consume inadequate protein, especially as they get older, and some experts feel that the RDA level for protein is set a bit too low, and I agree. The RDA for protein is .8 gm per kg of body of weight. Many experts feel it should be at least one gm of protein for every kg you weigh, So, if you weigh 70 kg, you need at least 70 gm of protein daily to help optimize your bone density, muscle tissue, and immune system (as antibodies are made of protein) and other for other reasons. Most women do not get this level of protein intake. This extra 25 gm of protein can easily be obtained by drinking a delicious whey protein shake, which I do personally, 4-5 times per week. Whey protein has high biological value for supporting muscle and bone protein synthesis and immunity.  

One chicken breast or turkey breast also contains about 25 gm of protein, as do 3-4 egg whites, or 10-12 oz of non-fat Greek Yogurt, or a 3.5 oz salmon steak. These are all good, low-fat, low cholesterol, sources of protein. The salmon steak has more fat, but it’s healthy omega-3 fat. 100 gm of tofu contains 17 gm of protein for individuals who are vegan or are trying to be more plant-based, which I also would endorse. Substituting beans and peas for pasta, bread, potatoes, and rice can also help you get more protein while keeping your blood sugar (glucose) lower, an important consideration in the prevention of diabetes and weight gain, and for reducing overall risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers. The takeaway message is that women should look at their diet to make sure they are getting sufficient protein each day.

 In Canada, one in three women will suffer an osteoporotic fracture in their lifetime (https://osteoporosis.ca/facts-and-stats/). In the U.S. osteoporosis prevalence among women increased from 14.0% in 2007–2008 to 19.6% in 2017–2018. One in two women in the U.S. will break a bone in the lifetime due to osteoporosis (https://www.bonehealthandosteoporosis.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Osteoporosis-Fast-Facts.pdf). So, overall, things are getting worse, not better, as the population ages. Adding 25 gm of additional healthy protein and consuming 3-5 cups per day of green tea and/or coffee, represent a couple of basic and easy strategies to help combat this serious health problem that disproportionately affects the female population. Of course, doing resistance training and/or weight-bearing exercises regularly and ingesting sufficient calcium (1,000 -1,200 mg per day) and magnesium (300 – 450 mg per day) and maintaining a blood vitamin D level between 75 – 150 nmol/L (30 – 60 ng/ml) are also critical strategies to reduce risk of osteoporosis. It is important to note that caffeine in coffee and tea can increase the loss of calcium from the body via the urine, so be sure to ingest at least 1,000 mg per day of calcium from food and/or supplements to guard against calcium loss, especially if you are ingesting coffee and/or tea on a daily basis. As you recall, the polyphenols in coffee and tea were associated with a decreased risk of osteoporosis in this large U.K. women’s study, but the presence of caffeine in these beverages does increase calcium loss. So, be mindful of this fact.

I have included the reference for the U.K. Women’s Cohort Study in the text below.

Reference:

James Webster, Darren C. Greenwood, Janet E. Cade. Foods, nutrients and hip fracture risk: A prospective study of middle-aged women. Clinical Nutrition, 2022; 41 (12): 2825 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36402009/

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 268 – More Evidence That Melatonin Supplementation Turns On Longevity Genes (SIRT1), Aids Fat-Burning in Overweight Subjects and Helps Protect Against Obesity-Induced Heart Damage

LMU-268

More Evidence That Melatonin Supplementation Turns On Longevity Genes (SIRT1), Aids Fat-Burning in Overweight Subjects and Helps Protect Against Obesity-Induced Heart Damage

Source: J Frontiers of Physiology (2020)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (December 14, 2022)

Many people know that melatonin levels decline as we age, which often results in poor sleep quality. As such, a growing number of adults now use melatonin as a sleep aid. In fact, the use of melatonin supplements has grown by more than 500 percent in the past two decades, from .4 percent in 1999–2000 to 2.1 percent of the population by 2017–2018 (https://www.everydayhealth.com/melatonin/research-shows-more-americans-trying-melatonin-despite-potential-risks/).

But most people are not aware of the other health and longevity benefits associated with melatonin supplementation. Melatonin is also an important antioxidant that is shown to protect many tissues, including the heart muscle and the brain. It also helps to regulate blood pressure and it helps to switch our metabolism into fat-burning mode. It even increases that activity or our brown fat, which helps us burn-off excess calories we may have consumed through the day and releases that energy as heat to the environment (thermogenesis), helping to prevent and combat weight gain. https://dmsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13098-020-00589-1#:~:text=Melatonin%20has%20been%20shown%20to,bodyweight%20reduction%20and%20glycemic%20improvement.

Melatonin also helps to favorably modulate insulin, leptin, and lipid secretions, all of which help to prevent weight gain and type 2 diabetes. Melatonin also indirectly suppresses the release of inflammatory cytokines, helping to prevent and better manage age-related arthritic conditions. Melatonin also indirectly stimulates the synthesis of two other important antioxidants (glutathione and heme-oxygenase-1) that protect our tissues from free radical damage linked to aging and cancer. As well, prostate, breast cells, and certain immune cells have melatonin receptors, and when they are stimulated by melatonin it blocks key steps in cancer development in the prostate and breast, and it enhances immune system function. (1)

Regarding fat-burning and weight loss, a 2014 study involving 56 postmenopausal women clearly showed that the addition of 5 mg melatonin supplementation to a standard weight loss diet significantly improved weight loss results in the group provided with the melatonin compared to the non-supplemented group. The marked reduction in weight and BMI occurred in just a 16-week period. The BMI reduction dropped from approximately 29 down to 27. This is a significant drop in just 16 weeks. The authors of this study also cited research indicating that lower levels of melatonin secretion in the autumn-winter period can increase appetite and lead to weight gain. This is another reason to consider melatonin during the fall and winter periods – to help prevent weight gain (2). In 2020, an animal model, published in the journal Frontiers of Physiology, showed another important effect of melatonin in preventing heart damage that typically occurs in cases of obesity. In essence, the obese mice given melatonin supplementation showed less obesity-induced heart damage than the obese mice not given melatonin (who showed higher heart weight, heart hypertrophy, and had higher blood pressure). Melatonin supplementation in obese mice also helped to prevent damage to the heart muscle’s mitochondria (where energy is synthesized to keep the heart pumping) and it reduced heart muscle inflammation. The researchers explained that melatonin turns on a key anti-aging, disease-prevention, and longevity gene known as Sirtuin1.

Once turned on by melatonin the sirtuin1 enzymes act as epigenetic switches that turn on:

  • Fat-burning and blood sugar-regulating genes
  • Blood pressure regulating genes – helping to prevent the development of high blood pressure
  • Synthesis of antioxidants (glutathione and heme oxygenase-1), which protect cells from free radical damage, including the heart muscle and brain cells.
  • Mitochondria biogenesis – producing new and healthy mitochondria in the heart muscle and other tissues like the brain.
  • And melatonin turns off inflammation-promoting genes.

The researchers stated, “We conclude that the SIRT1/PGC-1α/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway represents a vital target in the quest to prevent adverse obesogenic cardiac remodeling (1). This means that melatonin supplementation, through its activation of the SIRT1 Longevity Gene, helps to prevent heart damage that is typically caused by weight gain, high-fat diets, and obesity and that this effect probably occurs in humans. In 2017, a report in the journal Pineal Research revealed that melatonin stimulates the SIRT1 longevity gene and through this action imparts protective effects against aging, neurodegenerative conditions (Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, etc.), and cancer, and favorably impacts immune system function. (3)

I think the take-away message from all these studies is that it may be wise to use melatonin as a supplement for general anti-aging purposes by the age of 40 to help reduce risk of various age-related diseases and to support your immune system function (helping to guard against infections and cancer). As well, melatonin also helps improve fat-burning and can enhance the results of weight loss programs of all types. It also appears to help prevent some key aspects of heart damage that typically occurs in overweight individuals, which may help to reduce the risk of heart attack and congestive heart failure commonly seen in this high-risk group. Of course, melatonin helps to improve sleep quality, but its anti-aging, anti-neurodegenerative disease, anti-inflammatory, immune modulating, antioxidant-stimulating, fat-burning and anti-diabetic effects, make it a strong supplement consideration even for those of us who do not have have sleep issues. Certainly, the discovery that melatonin supplementation activates key longevity genes, Sirtuin-1 (as well as Sirtuin-3) is a very significant discovery in recent years.

I have included the references for this information in the text below.

References:

1. Sirtuin1 role in the melatonin protective effects against obesity-related heart injury. Frontiers of Physiology. March 11, 2020. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2020.00103/full

2. Walecka-Kapica E et al. The effect of melatonin supplementation on the quality of sleep and weight status in postmenopausal women. Prz Menopauzlny. 2014; 13(6): 334-338 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4352910/

3. Mayo JJ.C. et al. Melatonin and sirtuins: A “not-so unexpected” relationship. J Pineal Research. January 21, 2017. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpi.12391

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 267 – Metformin Shown to Double Risk of Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease in Large, 12-year Study with Type 2 Diabetics

LMU-267

Metformin Shown to Double Risk of Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease in Large, 12-year Study with Type 2 Diabetics

Source: 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (Abstract 312), presented on March 29, 2017, and reviewed in the December 5, 2022, Medscape Article

Lifestyle Medicine Update (December 6, 2022)

A very popular drug in the management of type 2 diabetes is the drug Metformin. In addition to helping to lower blood sugar (glucose levels), Metformin has also been shown to lower various other cardiovascular risk factors and it appears to block important steps in the development of many types of cancer (blocking the mTOR pathway, for example). In fact, diabetics using Metformin have been shown to have cancer rates that are 30% lower than diabetics using other glucose-lowering diabetic drugs.

These impressive findings have prompted some doctors to suggest that we all should take Metformin after the age of 50 to help reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, the two leading causes of death in our society. However, evidence published within the past decade has also shown that Metformin inhibits the function of the cell’s energy factory, known as the mitochondria. More specifically, it inhibits the function of Complex I in the mitochondria, which is vitally important for cells to make the energy they require for normal functioning. Studies show that impairment of Complex I in the mitochondria is an important step in the development of Parkinson’s disease, which is the leading movement disorder, affecting one in 600 people over the age of 60. Exposure to pesticides, rotenone, and paraquat, which inhibit Complex I in the mitochondria is strongly linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. Animal studies have confirmed that Complex I inhibitors, including rotenone and paraquat, cause the development of Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms in animals.

Because Metformin also inhibits Complex I in the cell’s mitochondria, it was postulated by some researchers that, like certain pesticides, it may also increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease.  These suspicions were realized in the research results presented at the 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (Abstract 312), presented on March 29, 2017, and discussed in a Medscape article published on December 5, 2022, entitled, “Metformin Use Linked to Increased Dementia, Parkinson’s Risk in Patients with Diabetes”.

In this study, researchers followed 9300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years and found that the risk for Parkinson’s disease and dementia was more than double in the diabetics treated with Metformin, compared to the diabetic patients who were treated with other glucose-lowering drugs during the same period. The results remained unchanged after controlling for all other risk factors for dementia and Parkinson’s disease. As they stated, “The cumulative incidences of Parkinson’s and dementia were significantly higher in our Metformin cohort at 12 years” (Dr. Kuan). The study also showed that the higher the dosage and the longer the duration of Metformin use, the greater the risk of Parkinson’s disease and dementia, especially after 300 days of continuous use and doses higher than 240 grams (2400 mg) per day.

I believe these findings are very important because as the population ages some doctors are suggesting that we use Metformin to help prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease, even if we don’t have type 2 diabetes. But this study is suggesting that it may have the negative effect of increasing the risk for dementia and Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, Metformin also depresses the immune system, which is associated with an increased risk for infections. So, it should interest you to know that some natural compounds work in a similar way as Metformin to reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease without increasing the risk of Parkinson’s disease and dementia or weakening the immune system. Some of these natural compounds include:

  • Soy isoflavones (found in soy products and soy extract supplements)
  • EGCG (found in green tea and green tea extract supplements)
  • Curcumin (found in the spice turmeric and curcumin-containing supplements)

Also included on this list of cancer and cardiovascular protecting strategies is Aerobic exercise and caloric restriction (including intermittent fasting), which also inhibit the mTOR pathway linked to cancer and cardiovascular disease risk.

I’ve been tempted over the years to use the drug Metformin as an intervention to further reduce cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, but the evidence pointing to an increased risk of dementia and Parkinson’s disease from use of this drug has convinced me to continue to exclusively use only the more natural nutrition, exercise, and supplementation strategies I have employed thus far. In fact, some of these natural supplements and food constituents, as well as exercise and caloric restriction, are shown to also help to prevent Parkinson’s disease and dementia as well. Nutrition and lifestyle medicine is good medicine, and it needs to be featured more in our overall conventional healthcare system.

I have included the references for all this information in the text below.

References:

Spivey A. Rotenone and paraquat linked to Parkinson’s disease: Human exposure study supports years of animal studies. Environ Health Perspect. 2011; 119 (6): A259 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114841/

Sherer TB et al. Mechanism of toxicity in rotenone models of Parkinson’s disease. J Neursci. 2002; 23 (34): 10756-10764. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6740985/

 Metformin use linked to increased dementia, Parkinson’s disease risk in patients with diabetes. Medscape. Monday December 5, 2022. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/877965#vp_2

Fontaine E. Metformin-induced mitochondrial complex I inhibition: Facts, uncertainties, and consequences. Frontiers in Endocrinology (Dec 17, 2018) https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2018.00753/full

Is Metformin a Wonder Drug Harvard Health Publishing (September 29, 2021). https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/is-metformin-a-wonder-drug-202109222605#:~:text=For%20decades%20we’ve%20known,with%20diabetes%20lose%20excess%20weight.

Saraei P et al. The beneficial effects of metformin on cancer prevention and therapy: A comprehensive review of recent advances. Cancer Manag Res. 2019; 11: 3295-3313. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6497052/

Natural Agents that Reduce Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease via mTOR pathway Inhibition similar to Metformin Cancer Prevention Effect:

Zhou H et al. Updates of mTOR inhibitors. Anticancer Agents Med Chem. 2010; Sept 1: 10 (7): 571-581 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2980558/#:~:text=Besides%2C%20some%20natural%20products%2C%20such,to%20inhibit%20mTOR%20as%20well

Huang C et al. Soy isoflavones regulate lipid metabolism through AKT/mTOR1 pathway in diet-induced obesity (DIO) male rats. J Molecules. 2016 May; 21 (5): 586 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6273643/

Bielak-Zmijewska et al. The role of curcumin in modulation of ageing. Int J Mol Sci. 2019; 29 (5): 1239 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6273643/

Agostini D et al. New insights into the role of exercise in inhibiting mTOR signaling in triple-negative breast cancer. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6186337/

Blagosklonny MV. Calorie restriction: Decelerating mTOR-driven aging from cells to organisms (including humans). Cell Cycle. 2009https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.4161/cc.9.4.10766

 

Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.

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LMU 266 – Regulating Your Body’s mTOR Signaling Pathway in Cancer Prevention

LMU-266

Regulating Your Body’s mTOR Signaling Pathway in Cancer Prevention

Source: J Anti-Cancer Agents Med Chem (2013) and Int J Mol Sci (2019)

Lifestyle Medicine Update (November 22, 2022)

You probably have never heard of the mTOR signaling pathway, but in many types of cancer, this signaling pathway is shown to be overactive, causing cancer to develop in the first place and/or promoting its relentless progression.  In this overactive state, the mTOR pathway stimulates cancer cells to divide and helps them form new blood vessels so that tumors can keep growing and spreading to distal parts of the body creating metastatic cancer. Most cancer researchers agree that regulating the mTOR signaling pathway in our body cells from day to day is one more important way we can help to reduce cancer risk and decrease the risk of cancer relapse. It can also slow the rate at which we age.

But to be clear, a short-term spike in mTOR signaling is a good thing, as means to preserve or gain muscle mass and bone density, which helps prevent us from becoming weak, frail, and osteoporotic as we age. Consuming ideal amounts of protein and doing resistance exercise training turns on the mTOR pathway in our muscle and bone cells for a short period of time to help us stay strong, enabling us to remain functional as we age. So, a short-term spike or burst in mTOR activity is not a problem. In fact, it is helpful. However, if the mTOR signaling pathway in our cells is constantly turned-on, then we set the stage for cancer, premature aging, and a variety of other health problems.

Regularly consuming excess calories (overeating), especially if it raises your blood sugar (glucose) level into a prediabetic or diabetic range and/or the ingestion of too much animal protein day after day, and/or the accumulation of excess body fat, all result in the mTOR pathway being constantly switched – on in our cells (constitutively up-regulated). This situation is associated with increased cancer risk for many types of cancer and increased risk of cancer recurrence in cancer survivors. As such, regulating the mTOR signaling pathway in your body is something you should keep on your radar from day to day, as part of your cancer prevention strategy. Balancing the short-term turning-on of your mTOR pathway to gain and preserve muscle and bone mass, while counterbalancing this with general inhibition of the mTOR pathway for most of your 24-hour wake-sleep cycle, is a desirable strategy to help to prevent cancer over your lifetime and extend your years of functional life (health span).

So how do you keep the mTOR signaling pathways in your cells from being overactive?

  1. Don’t overconsume animal protein. Plant-based protein foods do not stimulate the mTOR pathway as much as animal proteins, which are higher in branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine). In most cases, you can get away with consuming some low-fat animal protein foods, like skinless chicken breast, turkey breast, egg whites, fish, whey protein, and non-fat yogurt, but balance it out with plant protein foods as much as possible.
  2. Stay at your ideal body weight. Being overweight creates insulin resistance. In turn, your insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors (IGF-1) on your cells continuously stimulate the mTOR signaling pathway, thereby increasing risk for many types of cancer. Diabetics are known to have a higher cancer risk than non-diabetics, and this is largely due to overactivity of the mTOR signaling pathway.
  3. Intermittent fasting and systemic undereating (caloric restriction) can help to silence the mTOR pathway – but its not easy to do, of course. But even if you can regularly restrict food intake for 14-16 hours during your 24-hour wake-sleep cycle it is shown to silence the mTOR pathway and activate longevity genes (Sirtuin genes). As an example, not eating anything between 8 PM and 10 AM the next morning is one way to apply this strategy.
  4. Keep your fasting blood glucose level below 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L), by watching your carbohydrate intake and your waistline.
  5. Exercise regularly, both aerobic exercise and strength training – this also activates longevity genes like Sirtuin genes.
  6. Consume plant-based foods that contain natural mTOR pathway inhibitors:
  • Apigenin – a flavonoid found in abundance in oranges, apples, cherries, grapes, onions, parsley, broccoli, sweet green pepper, celery, barley, tomatoes, and tea.
  • Curcumin – a polyphenol found in the spice turmeric
  • Fisetin – a flavonoid found in strawberries, apples, persimmons, and onions
  • Idole-3-Carbinol – found in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, Bok choy, and turnips.
  • Isoflavones – a class of flavonoid phenolic compounds found in soybeans, such as genistein and daidzein. Consumption of most soy foods provides a generous amount of soy isoflavones
  • Quercetin – a polyphenolic compound found in tea, onions, red grapes, and apples.
  • Resveratrol – a polyphenol found in the skin of red grapes
  • Caffeine is also an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway and regular coffee drinking is associated with a reduction of various cancers (liver, colon, etc.)
  • EGCG (Epigallocatechin gallate) – found in green tea and green tea extract supplements, is also an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway. EGCG is well known as a natural agent possessing various anti-cancer properties.

7. In addition to the regular consumption of foods that contain mTOR pathway inhibitors, many health-conscious people take supplements each day that contain some of these mTOR signaling inhibitors, as an additional prevention measure. For instance, many supplements in the marketplace contain:

  • Curcumin – often used to reduce inflammation
  • Indole-3-carbinol – often used to enhance detoxification and for other cancer-prevention properties
  • Soy Extract (containing isoflavones) – for prostate health and to reduce hot flashes during menopause
  • EGCG – to help burn excess body fat

All these compounds provide the secondary benefit of toning down the mTOR pathway and thus, they are all associated with decreased cancer risk in many studies. The bottom line on this topic is that one additional way to help reduce cancer development and cancer recurrence is by not overstimulating the mTOR signaling pathways in your body cells on an ongoing basis. This can be done through the targeted nutrition, lifestyle, and exercise information I have provided in this update, and further supported by use of certain dietary supplements, as I have outlined.

I have included the references for this information in the text below.

 

References:
1. Huang S. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling by natural products. Anticancer Agents Med Chem. 2013; 13 (7): 967-970 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775843/

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6387042/#:~:text=Aberrant%20mTOR%20signaling%20resulting%20from,to%20tumor%20initiation%20and%20progression.

3. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41523-020-00187-4

4. https://www.oncotarget.com/article/25253/text/


Eat Smart, Live Well, Look Great,

Dr. Meschino

Recommended Supplements

Dr. James Meschino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. James Meschino, DC, MS, ROHP, is an educator, author, and researcher having lectured to thousands of healthcare professionals across North America. He holds a Master’s Degree in Science with specialties in human nutrition and biology and is recognized as an expert in the field of nutrition, anti-aging, fitness, and wellness as well as the author of numerous books.